Category Archives: Mechanics

Mechanics Update

Things I learned at the Vail LAREDO 3

USL TrainingThis summer I attended my first US Lacrosse Referee Development (LAREDO) clinic.  The LAREDO program began in the late 1980s as a way to teach two and three-man mechanics to officials in areas new to lacrosse. Clinics are led by experienced clinicians, all of whom are elite officials with years of experience both on the field and in the classroom.  The program has evolved to provide opportunities for officials at various points in their careers and now serves as a means of standardizing best practices throughout the country.  Level 1 clinics are primarily aimed at rookie officials and reinforce basics two-man mechanics.  Level 2 clinics are geared towards officials with three to four years of experience who have a solid grounding in two-man mechanics. These clinics introduce a more nuanced understanding of game management practices and principles.  The Level 3 LAREDOs are for experienced high school officials looking to master three-man mechanics and are often seen as a stepping stone to the collegiate ranks. Continue reading

October 25 Referee Clinic Registration Closed

UPDATE: The October 25th 25th class 25th class is full. 

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Communication Maintains The Threshold

This is an examination of three separate body checks in one Varsity game from not too long ago with a three-man crew. Region game between two skilled teams that were up and down through the season. It was going to be a good game if both teams showed up with their “A” game. They both played strong and it turned out to be a barn burner of a game with lots of up and down action and some very hard hits. It was a night game under the lights and a very loud crowd for each team. As a ref this is a game you remember for a while because the atmosphere was electric all the way to the final horn. Continue reading

Youth Official Certification

US Lacrosse provides training, certification and insurance for youth and adult officials.  You can read about the steps needed to complete in order to begin working games here on the US Lacrosse website: Men’s Training and Certification Process.
For those under 18 years of age, there are essentially five steps that one must complete in order to become a certified US Lacrosse Official.
 us lax logo 1. Be a registered member of US Lacrosse.
 ONLINE 2. Complete the Online US Lacrosse Men’s Officiating Webinar.  Print out certificate of completion and bring to class. Please note that at present the help link on this page is broken, but you may view the help guide here.
 peachwhite 3. Attend the In-Person Class with ALO.
 2014rules 4. Pass the both the NFHS Rules Test and US Lacrosse Youth Test online.For more information on the tests, please review this guide.
 penalty-flag2.jpg 5. Work a Field Training with ALO or you may arrange with ALO to work with an approved trainer in your area.

USLAXPATCHALO offers classes and field training throughout the year. The cost for new officials training is $40.  Students receive a a copy of the latest NFHS Rules Book, US Lacrosse Training Guide, a youth pre-game sheet, Fox 40 finger whistle, penalty flag and a US Lacrosse Officials patch upon completion of all requirements.

Annual Re-Certification

Once an official has become an official, they are still required to re-certify every season. Officials must attend a free rules and mechanics clinic and pass the youth and NFHS rules test.   ALO offers these clinics in the spring.

If you have ANY questions, please contact Greg Hite at ATL.LacrosseRef@gmail.com or Gordon Corsetti GordonCorsetti@gmail.com.

The Ball Will Distract You

I vividly remember one particular clear during the 2012 Vail Shootout while I was officiating at the LAREDO 3 clinic. I had reached the far cone as the single side official after starting my timer when the new trail official signaled reset once the goalie made a save. My feet were ready to take me down the other half of the field at a moment’s notice and I was focused on the clear coming towards midfield. All of a sudden the goalkeeper noticed his attackman on the far side was wide open and he launched the ball towards his teammate. I tracked the ball as it flew through the air and before it reached it’s apex I heard:

“You’re ball-watching!”

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