Monthly Archives: February 2014

Putting The Good Behind You

In a game not too long ago my partner and I left the field and discussed what we could have done better. I mentioned I didn’t consistently focus on when a foul would release by looking at the score clock. He mentioned that he wanted to come in bigger on a wiped goal. That was it. We walked off that field and drove out of the parking lot knowing we put out maximal effort as individual officials and showed excellent communication and consistency as a crew.

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Keeping Your Focus In Blowout Games

Keeping Your Focus In A Blowout Game

It is not difficult to pay attention in a tight 10-9 game between two rivalry teams with the stands packed and the stadium filled with electric excitement. In those games it is not hard to hustle to every position, signal with authority, and get a good feel for the temperament of the players and coaches. Those games demand that the officials pay attention, and the environment presses the officials to focus. Blowout games are an entirely different exercise.

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Push with Possession: When is a push a not a push?

push

The push with possession call: it is one of the most important and misunderstood calls in lacrosse. But it appears as if pushes with possession are a different story. Why do so many go seemingly uncalled? A relatively soft nudge in the back that pushes a player out of bounds gets a flag, while a hard shove from behind in the middle of the field gets a free pass.  Coaches and fans start yelling “You gotta call it both ways ref!” So when is a push a push. What gives?  Four factors come into play when determining whether a push really is a push:  the rule, the principle of advantage/disadvantage (TPOAD), location and level of play. Continue reading

Simultaneous Fouls in NFHS Boys Lacrosse

Without a doubt, the most confusing section of the lacrosse rule book is Rule 7-6: Simultaneous Fouls. Many veteran officials make these calls incorrectly without realizing it, because in few cases do the coaches—or anyone else watching the game—understand the correct enforcement. Of course, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be trying to make the right calls! Continue reading

The Value of a Pre-Game Conference

For most lacrosse officials, you arrive at the field twenty minutes before the game.  It is imperative that you and your crew get on the same page quickly. A  well officiated lacrosse game is managed by a team of officials, not two or three individuals doing their own thing.  The two things that hold a crew together are solid mechanics and communication.  I am a sheet guy.  I hand out a printed pre-game to my crew that covers everything I want to review.
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